North Carolina Coalition to End Homelessness

2014 Annual Homeless Assessment Report (AHAR)

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) released the 2014 Annual Homeless Assessment Report to Congress (AHAR) on October 30, 2014. The AHAR finds significant and measurable progress to reduce the scale of long-term or 'chronic' homelessness as well as homelessness experienced by Veterans and families.

HUD’s annual ‘point-in-time’ estimates seek to measure the scope of homelessness on a single night in January. Based on data reported by state and local planning agencies, last January’s one-night estimate reveals a 33 percent drop in homelessness among veterans, including a 43 percent reduction in unsheltered homelessness among veterans, since 2010 and a 10.5 percent decline since last year. State and local communities also reported a 15 percent decline in the number of families with children experiencing homelessness since 2010, as well as a 53 percent reduction among these families who were found be to unsheltered.

On a single night in January 2014, state and local planning agencies reported:

  • 578,424 people were homeless representing an overall 10 percent reduction from January 2010. Most homeless persons (401,051 or 70 percent) were located in emergency shelters or transitional housing programs while 177,373 persons were unsheltered.
  • Veteran homelessness fell by 33 percent (or 24,837 persons) since January 2010. On a single night in January 2013, 49,993 veterans were homeless.
  • Chronic or long-term homelessness among individuals declined by 21 percent (or 22,937 persons) since 2010.
  • The number of families with children experiencing homelessness declined 15 percent (or 11,833 households) since 2010. The number of unsheltered families fell 53 percent during that same time period.
  • The number of unaccompanied homeless youth and children was relatively unchanged overall, at 45,205. There was a 3 percent decrease in those who were unsheltered.

The AHAR reports are available on the HUD Exchange website.

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